Is It Hypocrisy to Ask Locals to Be Self-Supporting?

“How can I not give a support salary to a local believing leader when I myself am funded by support?”

This is not an uncommon struggle for missionaries who are trying to plant self-supporting churches in foreign contexts. If it’s OK for me to be living on support from Western churches, well then why not this local evangelist? It’s easy to see why this question rests heavy on the minds of missionaries, awash as they usually are in requests for financial help from locals.

And yet dependency upon Western dollars is a major problem, undercutting the emergence of healthy churches in many places overseas and stunting local believers in their growth. Time and again, well-meaning teams, organizations, and visitors will generously give out cash, vehicles, and salaries to locals who are indeed in financial need. Soon this becomes the expectation. In my Central Asian context there has never been a self-supporting local church. The precedent set by Christian organizations here is that local believers should usually be hired, salaried, and otherwise financially supported. Because of this, local aspiring church leaders hunt on social media and in our region for foreign patrons who will bankroll them so that they can finally serve Jesus as they feel they deserve to. Locals hosting a house church demand that the church pay their monthly rent. Other believers balk at the idea of doing discipleship without financial remuneration. After all, a worker is worthy of his wages. Sadly, entitlement is not too strong a word to use for the money culture that exists here among the small community of local believers.

The saddest part of it all is that local believers don’t learn how to give sacrificially. Dependent as they are on Western dollars, they often give a tiny symbolic amount to their local gathering – a massive contrast to their generosity toward their kin and close friends. The culture of giving among local believers is woefully underdeveloped. So it becomes a reinforcing cycle. Locals don’t give because the Western dollars are expected to flow liberally. The Western dollars flow because the locals don’t give, meaning their leaders can’t provide for their families. Locals therefore stay spiritual children in this regard, not growing up into the mature blessings that come from giving sacrificially (2 Cor 9).

My approach among my local friends is to simply ask their community to do what ours back in the West (and in Melanesia) has done. Work hard. Give generously to the church. Support your pastors. Serve the poor. Then give even more to send out your own evangelists and church planters. This is what has happened among healthy church networks all over the world. We are not asking our local friends to go through any kind of a different process. “Your people should do what my people have done.” It’s that simple. The shortcuts are treacherous. I live on support, yes, and I am therefore a preview of what your church will also be able to do if you embrace the New Testament vision of work and giving to the glory of God. You will send supported missionaries to other places who will also there raise up self-funded churches.

It is not hypocrisy for me to live on support and to ask my local friends to have locally-supported leaders. I am for them. I am for their spiritual maturity. I long for the day when local funds raised by local churches will send locals as cross-cultural missionaries to other people groups. This can happen. But it won’t happen if they remain dependent on Western dollars, stunted spiritually by the lack of this spiritual discipline of giving – and in greater danger of the ever-encroaching love of money. A worker is worthy of his wages (1 Tim 6:18). But let’s make sure we notice the context of that verse. The previous sentences are speaking of elders who lead well (v. 17). These are men who are tested, who are not new converts, who were free from the love of money before they became elders (1st Tim 3, Titus 1). These are men who have a track record of faithful leadership. Years of faithfulness have been invested without pay into the local church. By all means, let’s salary these kinds of brothers so they can be more free to devote themselves to the word and to prayer! But let that salary be locally-raised, or, part of high-accountability decreasing support plan where foreign support gets lower as local support ramps up – not unlike what we do for most North American church plants.

I’m not saying that there’s never an appropriate time for foreign dollars to fund local leaders overseas. But in many contexts it has caused absolute carnage among the churches. Foreign dollars are certainly among our top three church-killers locally. We need to grapple with this. Foreign financial support, if attempted, must be done very carefully and wisely, always with an explicit vision toward self-supporting local churches. There are usually better ways to invest Western money, such as helping local leaders get the training needed to start a business or get hired. Teach a man to fish, as the saying goes. Or, like Paul, teach a man to make tents.

I will have another chance to sit down with some local brothers this next week. They have asked to meet me and I’ve learned that they have a reputation for being salary-seekers. Money will likely come up. I hope to humbly invite them to follow me as I follow Christ. I’ve walked a good, hard, slow path toward now being fully supported to do gospel work. My path involved years of faithful volunteering, demonstrating to myself and to the church that I would do the work of evangelism, discipleship, and service no matter what, support or no support. “Will you also follow this good path that many others have walked before us? Will your people do as my people have done?” It may be harder, but in the end it is indeed a sweeter road – and safer too.

Photo by Fredrik Öhlander on Unsplash

7 thoughts on “Is It Hypocrisy to Ask Locals to Be Self-Supporting?

  1. I work in a mission school that aims to, with a fair bit of success, enable missionary families to remain in the field longer.

    We employ a mix of western and local staff. The local staff are paid a locally appropriate wage but it is less than the stipend our western staff are paid (who often have supporters at home providing even more).

    It feels inequitable to me that two people doing the same job can get paid differently.

    On the other hand, we’re paying a fair wage to our local workers and our western wages are MUCH lower than what our western workers would earn doing the same job in their passport countries. And the fact that we pay expats “so much” (by mission and local standards) does help attract Christian workers who aren’t able to raise as much support from home.

    Do you have any wisdom on whether we should be paying our local workers more? Or our expat workers less?

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    1. Great question. Without knowing too many of the specifics of the situation, I only have a few thoughts. I would be curious to know what the locals think of this arrangement – if they feel it makes sense or if they feel it’s unjust. Sometimes wages can be excellent local wages and thus not actually unjust but can appear unjust to an outsider. True justice in these situations really has to do with whether or not individuals in their unique context are treated honorably, not necessarily how something might appear. This is harder than ever in the age of social media. We do also have a pretty widely accepted concept also of wages being tied to cost of living. My organization has something called field parity supplement, where all workers get the same base salary, but your FPS changes based on cost of living where you are. Thus I technically make more money than my peer living in India. But his groceries might cost only a tiny fraction of the cost of mine. Perhaps there could be a creative solution where salaries are actually the same base rate, but then there’s some kind of supplemental income for those dependent on maintaining support networks in other countries. But I commend these questions being asked as these are the kinds of situations that require great wisdom (and honest conversation) to navigate so that bitterness and envy don’t develop.

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